Web presence/present

Thanks to my marvellous brother I now have a fully functioning website out there. Still tweaks to do, and things to add, but there always will be.

http://www.kateahardy.com

 

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Word, and other distractions

Finally, after about two hours, several you-tube tutorials and much swearing, I managed to create a try-out for the cover of my newly edited, ‘Hundred and Fifty-Eighth Book’.

Now, to attempt the even more complex (for me anyway) Lulu Publishing Cover program.

Then to attempt the almost impossible task of ensnaring an Agent . . .

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Website

Working on it . . . My dear brother came to stay and spent about 80% of his break making me a site. Now I have to work through the very long list he’s left me, and that’s fine. It’s making me step back and look at all the stuff, not just the books but the paintings and photographs that are part of what makes up my fairly visual way of writing.

I would never have thought of including the art but he just went ahead and put it up there and I’m now very glad he did. It’s part of who I am, how I record the everyday and the unusual – sketches, snaps, thoughts scribbled down.

So, website to appear in the near future featuring my books, my scribbles, paintings and photographs. Back to the things to do . . .

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Corner of my writing room (bedroom) and a painting from my ‘Train Window’ series

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Sixth review for the Hundred and Fifty-Eighth Book

Katherine has read, I think, everything I have written and is always generous with her time, giving very useful feedback and writing reviews for me on Goodreads, Amazon, etc. I still use her early reviews for ‘Alfi Beasti, don’t eat that!’ and the ‘Going Out in the Midday Sun’ trilogy, and in fact for most of my books as she has a knack of, without waffle, creatively encapsulating the elements of the writing.

 

“If you found a book that contained your entire life from beginning to end, would you read it?”

Such is the dilemma, one of many often posed on the internet, which is faced by the protagonist in ”The Hundred and Fifty – Eighth Book”.
 
Hamish, a Bloomsbury bookseller, stumbles upon the red leather bound volume during a quiet morning at his shop. On opening the first chapter it seems that the narrative bears an uncanny resemblance to recent events in his life.  From this mysterious beginning, the reader is propelled into a fast paced and curious romp through 1980’s London, where it soon becomes clear that there may indeed be more than one version of this book.
 
Hamish’s adventures are deeply rooted in the era and place.  The sights, sounds and smells of 1980’s London are beautifully evoked by an author who clearly knows her patch and the setting is further enhanced by her own atmospheric drawings. Ms Hardy has a strong eye for detail, for the small everyday things that are easily overlooked but are very evocative of a time or place.
 
The characters are so affectionately depicted that one feels they must be at least partly based on real people of Ms Hardy’s acquaintance! I particularly liked Hamish’s mother and Evan, the Yorkshire chapters in which they feature forming a poignant contrast to the rest of the narrative.
 
This is a cleverly woven and most enjoyable tale. “To whoever picks this up” hang on to your hat!  You are in for a colourful and intriguing ride!
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Giveaways

Is it worth doing? I dread to imagine how much money I must have spent over the years handing out various tomes in the hope that people would read, enjoy and give (hopefully) constructive criticism. Yes it is worth doing – essential to my mind, and as much as possible. How else can you glean information as to whether you are rowing down a flowing river of possibilities or stuck in a swampy ditch with a defunct outboard motor?

So, what about throwing stuff out there into the wider world: not just friends and acquaintances? Goodreads Giveaways . . . having thought about it a few times I decided to give it a go with Hoxton – a tad stupid as these are hard-backs and the outlay of sending five out there was not inconsiderable – at all. I did it, received an email disclosing the fact that over a thousand folk had bid (quite encouraging in itself) and then the addresses of the winners. After reading a forum or two, I had pressed ‘worldwide’ including Tibet, Siberia, the Congo et al, (you never know, could be an English speaker keen to read about Dystopian London, in Tibet). Three winners were in the UK and two in America . . . one of the profiles revealing the somewhat invisible person had marked something like 8,000 books to read, no stars and no reviews. I protested in an email to Goodreads but it was just ‘luck of the draw’ and that copy is probably in a boot-sale pile – shit; the rest? God knows, but, yesterday I checked the site and there was a lovely review from a young woman ending with ‘It is an amazing book and I loved it’.

So, worth it for one review? Possibly not but that one review has prodded me into doing something with Hoxton – currently rather abandoned on the writerly back-burner. Cover to be done, corrections to correct, self-publish and promote.

 

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rough for a cover

 

 

 

 

Fifth review for the 158th book

Penny avidly read my first books – the trilogy, Going out in the Midday Sun, and loved them. Less keen on the futurist duo of books – Hoxton and Smithi, and always honest if something doesn’t work for her. Along with other friends she has been generous with her time: checking endless synopsis attempts, agent grovel letters, etc etc. Critical but always positive, and as a photographer she appreciates the visual slant to my books. I was so happy when she responded this way after she had read the book.

I can best describe this novel is a quirky page-turner. It took me a moment to care about Hamish, but once I did, I was hooked. The book is full of odd but believable characters. The descriptions so deftly bursting with detail – at times poignant, and others downright hilarious –  that I found it to be far more than the holiday read I expected. Towards the end I couldn’t put it down. I’d love to see it turned into a TV film.

From the many extracts I’d like to quote, here’s one.

 

The young woman eyes me with a smirk. “Didn’t quite do the job?”

“Sorry?”

“The lilies – half an hour ago. Or . . . is it for another lady?”

Suppressing an urge to make the flower shop assistant into a sculpture of buckets, moss and delphiniums, I smile serenely.

“Yes, it is for another lady – the one I will make crazed, sticky and overheated love to after I have presented her with the bouquet that you will fabricate for me from those pink roses over there.”

She stares at me for a moment – which I would have done too.

 

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Fourth review for 158th book

From Ruth, great friend, grammar expert and reader of my stuff from the first early drafts. If she winced at my terrible comprehensive school English she did it internally, and kindly steered me in the direction, along with other generous friends, of communicating what was in my head onto screen and paper.

A roller-coaster of a read with never a dull moment. Life mirrors fiction in this fantastical novel; at least it does if you start reading one of the five copies of the novel ‘Five’. Each has a different ending, so, as our hero discovers, best to avoid owning or reading a version with a not-so-good ending. The twists and turns chart his progress from when he first realises that what he reads in ‘Five’ will happen to him. The action is set against an atmospheric backdrop of 1980s’ London – Liberty’s, Muswell Hill, Chelsea, the East End – and Yorkshire too – pubs, beer and dramatic landscapes.

Descriptions of places and settings are keenly observed: colours, smells, décor and scenery flow from the text like a film.

The fantastic elements of the novel can be wonderfully crazy: our hero – broke, but given money by a dear elderly friend to spend on something frivolous – does just that: a Citroen DS (opal green). These are the details I particularly love.   Who buys an Armani suit in a Bond Street store when facing bankruptcy? Our hero does. To block out worries of losing his shop and his home, he reads more of ‘Five’. True to the text, he falls in love, immediately!  The story dips in and out of his relationships with friends, his mother (and her new man) and sister, his ex, and –  of course –  his new love.

It’s an entertaining read – great fun and wonderfully romantic!

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