First review for the 158th Book

as a novel.

I had many for it as a short story, and nearly all of them enthusiastic, which then spurred me on to write it up into a novel. Actually, for me anyway, it’s a great way of commencing a book – launching off into an unknown sea of imagination but with distant landmasses of information all around as reference points.

After receiving two copies of the second edit from Lulu-publishing, I had a quick check through to make sure chapters hadn’t slipped out from the process somehow, and gave them away to be read. I’d like to feel the book could be enjoyed by any age-group from young adult to vintage¬†adult, and was delighted that Bill, (in the latter category, although to speak to him you wouldn’t know it) an avid devourer of novels, was willing to read and give his opinion.

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“It was a first-class read from start to finish. I marvel at your imagination and ability to constantly put everyone, especially the reader, in a whirl. I must now read your other volumes and am, of course,¬† looking forward very much to your next book.” ¬†

To state or not to state

I don’t really set out to write with any particular age group in mind – well, perhaps not ‘kids’ as the language and occasional scenes might not be appropriate – mind you after being told to fuck off by a three year old when I had stopped to tie a shoe-lace outside his gate when I was last in the UK – maybe not . . .

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Anyway, I’ve just been told by someone in the ‘industry’ that it must be stated, categorised, pigeon-holed, marked out and carved in stone – what is the age of the reader? I don’t know. I really don’t. I’ve had readers of twenty through to eighty-five and many in between who all seem to chomp their way through the book and give hearty feedback.

I was greatly pleased to find this wonderful Will Self talking to Will Self ‘interview’ where, amongst other subjects he discusses this very thing and concludes that it is probably a mistake to alienate possible audiences though stating ‘reader age’.

https://www.theguardian.com/books/video/2014/sep/03/will-self-interviews-will-self-video

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I remember my mother raising an eyebrow when I was in the middle of reading Papillon when I was twelve and then notching the brow a tad higher when I came back with a copy of Sexus, ‘borrowed’ from the shelves where I used to babysit as a fourteen year-old. I don’t think it did me any harm, and how many ‘Oldies’ have I seen on trains reading Harry Potter and teen vampire stuff? I don’t suppose anyone envisaged such a readership crossover at the time of the initial editorial meetings.